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Focus on music education

In any other course nintey-five percent would be near perfection. Is it good enough for music?

Very rarely does a percussion program exist where a school music program does not. You may never find drum set lessons where there are only sports programs. When music isn't offered in a school drum and percussion education is nowhere to be found. I am confident that any reader will know one student or one parent, maybe even a music educator, who has had music, and therefor percussion, ripped from their schools.

There are many reasons to keep the programs but it is always a question of money spent versus money returned. A football team may offer a greater return on investment than an indoor percussion ensemble or symphonic band.

How can we let people who are not musicians remove music from schools?

Dr. Jack Stamp, a professor of Music, Chairperson of the Music Department and Director of Band Studies at Indiana University of Pennsylvania explains the importance of music. An interesting point is that a 95% in any other course would be an 'A' and on the football field you get four attempts. Music must be perfect.

Education and constant improvement and overcoming what was once challenging is key in musicianship. While Evansville area schools have great music programs where a student learns all aspect of percussion there is a sharp drop in quality of education in most private lessons offered in local music stores. Most drum lessons are just that, lessons on the drums. Most lessons focus on playing by ear and, while it is a useful and often mandatory skill to posess, we are neglecting the ability to read music and maintain even playing no matter what sort of metric pattern is being played. Without sight reading ability how else will we communicate and share our ideas with others? How can we learn what others have done?

Read Dr. Stamp's bio and learn more about the IUP music department: link 

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